More news from Dahab

One of the reasons for returning to Dahab last month was to help a Saluki-type dog who had been suffering with complications after fracturing bones in a front leg. The injury occurred a few months ago and a very kind Egyptian lady and her husband had taken him in and cared for him.

Fracture repair in Dahab is not easy. Radiography is basic and apart from casting and resting, other procedures such as pinning, external fixation or plating are non existent We are always reminded during these visits about how fortunate we are back home.
The dog was unable to use the left foreleg which had actually become a hindrance. Seeing him I was reminded of my grandfather who had a paralysed arm after a stroke and frequently complained of the dead weight of this arm.

Karin of Animal Welfare Dahab had asked if we could amputate the leg. After examining the dog we decided that this was indeed the best option. The procedure can take quite a bit of time and without gas anaesthesia or our full arsenal of painkillers we set to work. Lisa did her magic with the drugs available including local anaesthesia and the surgery went well.

Visiting the dog 2 days later was a joy – he was desperate to go for a walk on the beach and looked so much happier and comfortable. It felt really good!

Thank you to all the people who support us back home and also thank you to Karin and the people who help her at Animal Welfare Dahab. Also thanks to Dr Amira for letting us use all her equipment and premises and for assisting us during the operation.

 

 

Karen

Return to Dahab, October 2018

On Monday Lisa and I attended a meeting organised by Animal Welfare Dahab (AWD) and their supporters, to present the new mayor of Dahab, General Tarek, their vision of how to approach the stray dog and cat population in the town.
They had managed to persuade the authorities to temporarily stop the random poisoning of street dogs, and needed to get the new mayor on board to stop this permanently, and offer an alternative plan.

All the important people attended.
The mayor, the chief vet for the South Sinai, and the local state vet were all there.
Also present was Dr Amira, who is a local vet and a great help to AWD.
Then there were various officials, a representative of the Bedouin, AWD, the Dutch NGO Stichting Zwerfdieren Dahab, and a few local supporters.

Michel (from Stichting Zwerfdieren Dahab) had prepared an excellent power-point presentation which was very successful. He managed to swing the mayor’s opinion away from basically locking all street dogs in compounds. Instead the Trap, Neuter, Release program (TNR) will be allowed to continue and a government assisted tagging system of privately owned dogs will begin.
We are very grateful that the mayor has accepted this approach to the problem.

Since the first TNR project in 2010 the street dog population has decreased by almost 50%. AWD has neutered and vaccinated over 500 dogs and local AWD supporters monitor the dogs in their areas.
We are proud to be part of the solution to a very complex problem.

Karen

Running for the Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund

For the past 4 years I have run the British 10k in London, supporting the PCRF, the Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund.

In the village where Karen & I live, we lost 2 people, prematurely and unexpectedly, to pancreatic cancer.
Wendy and Ken.
When I run I think of them, I carry them with me.

So this year we’re doing it again.
This coming weekend, on Sunday 15 July. And it’s going to be a scorcher.
Just like last year, my cousin, Marieke, is running with me. This time she brings more support from Holland: her dad, Gerard, who is running his first 10k, and her friend, Willemijn.
So it’ll be four of us running in the red-and-yellow shirt of the PCRF

Last year we raised almost £1,700, a total we should be able to beat this year… with your help. Please support us.
You can donate by clicking this link https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/harrykappen
Alternatively, if you are in the area, you can pop into the Practice and fill out the sponsorship form.

You can read more about the PCRF here: http://www.pcrf.org.uk/

Thank you!

Back from the Caribbean

I am back from the Caribbean, re-adjusting to the cold, while Cabayo, the dog mentioned in the previous post, is still at the clinic in Carriacou. And making great progress.

Talya, his owner, came to visit him one Saturday morning while I was still there and spent some time with her much loved dog. When she left, Cabayo really got quite agitated and tried to climb over the fence in an attempt to follow her. Thankfully he was soon back to his normal, cheerful self and the other dogs seemed to take his mind off his beloved owner.

Cabayo’s degloving injury is healing slowly but surely. The skin on his paw has basically all regrown and we have been able to close the wound more and more every few days.

The biggest problem is the carpal joint, where the joint capsule was damaged during the accident. Joint capsules don’t tend to heal easily, so he will most likely retain a slight limp .The alternative would have been to amputate his leg – so-called “tripods” are not popular in the Caribbean, so on balance, a limp is not a bad result.

Doris

 

Doris returns to the Caribbean

Doris has returned to Carriacou Animal Hospital in Grenada to help out at the veterinary clinic. They have put her straight back to work.


One of her first patients was this gorgeous dog who had been involved in a traffic accident on another island.

Cabayo

The dog, Cabayo, belongs to a school girl who really loves him.  The ferry would not take the injured dog over to the island where Doris was working so the little girl had to get another boat to take him there.

Cabayo had a severe de-gloving injury (basically stripping of the skin) which Doris has cleaned and dressed and the progress in healing is quite amazing as you can see.

Thank you to all who bought tickets in our pre-Christmas raffle so that we could send some funds to the charity. Thank you also to Doris for giving up her time to do such valuable work. We are very proud of you.

Of course it is not all work!! That would make Doris a very dull girl and we wouldn’t want that!

 

Successful run for Pancreatic Cancer Research

We successfully completed our London run. It was uncomfortably warm and neither of us was in the best of health. But most importantly, we managed to raise more than £1,600 for the PCRF (Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund). We are very grateful to all those who supported us. THANK YOU!

Maggie Blanks, founder of the PCRF, with sweaty but happy runners on either side

 

 

Running the British 10k in London for Wendy and Ken

I’m running the British 10k London again, on Sunday 9 July. This time without Lisa, who is injured. But with Marieke, my cousin.

Wendy Butler and Ken Smith both lived in our village and succumbed to pancreatic cancer. Every year I run, in their memory, to raise money for the Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund. Last year we raised in excess of £1,600 and we hope, with your help, to raise a similar amount this year. So please help us. 

You can donate by clicking on this link:
https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/harry-kappen3

We are also collecting money at the practice, if that is more convenient.

If you want to find out more about PCRF, and the good work they do, please click this link: http://www.pcrf.org.uk/

Thank you!

Harry